The Art of the Bawdy Song

October 11, 2016 - Comment

Pièces de Purcell, Weelkes, Blow, d’Urfey, etc. / The Baltimore Consort & The Merry Companions – date de sortie : 01/09/1998

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Pièces de Purcell, Weelkes, Blow, d’Urfey, etc. / The Baltimore Consort & The Merry Companions – date de sortie : 01/09/1998

Comments

Rick Douglas Janssen says:

Gorgeous melodies, scandalous lyrics! From the opening instrumental this CD fills the listener’s mind with images of sunny open fields, a busy Medieval or Renaissance city, or better yet, a popular corner pub complete with a burly barkeep and a saucy barmaid.I found myself humming these catchy melodies over and over, and at first listening the songs are very melodious and beautiful…and then you start to understand the words the performers are singing. This CD is titled “Bawdy” for a reason.The songs range…

George Peabody says:

a voice teacher and early music fan NOT TRUE BARROOM SINGING; BUT DEFINITELY BAWDY!These bawdy catches and ballads take us on a journey to the taverns and other social gathering places of the the real ‘Merry Old England’. Some of us may be mildly shocked by the directness and earthiness of the text, but everyday life in the 17th century was much more ‘down-to’earth- and forward. These texts-some blatant and other euphemistic-fully explore the spectrum of humor from the sly smirk to the back-slapping guffaw…

Brianna Neal says:

A sly and rollicksome good time! On this recording, the Baltimore Consort and the Merry Companions are full of fun, both blatant and tongue-in-cheek. Soprano Custer La Rue and the instrumentalists of the Consort are joined by a quartet of classical male singers (Peter Becker, Alexander Blachly, Paul Shipper and James Weaver) with quite a theatrical sense of humor. The two groups take turns presenting ribald tavern songs of merry old England, interspersed by light, catchy instrumentals listed in the credits as the “Prelewd”,…

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